Backhand Smash

A backhand smash in tennis is one of the complicated and unique smashes executed by seasoned and professional tennis players. The smash is a shot that is hit like a served-like motion with the racket above the player. High backhand volleys are harder to execute and would be difficult for a beginner. It is executed with almost exact precision to be able to return a ball at an exact angle that will lead the ball to spin. Despite offering less power than the popular forehand, the backhand smash is one of the more consistent shots that can be achieved during a match. However, power is still relative to the control and balance, together with the overall rotation and movement during every strike.

Rod Laver is one of the popular tennis players who happen to have a very powerful backhand. He is a left-handed athlete and was on the top 1 spot for professional tennis from 1964 to 1970. He also ranked first during his amateur years from 1961 to 1962. Another left-handed player and known power house for backhands is Jimmy Connors. He is considered as one of the greatest players in the history of tennis. He turned pro in 1972 after two years of being an amateur. His two-handed backhand was considered as one of the anticipated highlights during his matches. He retired in 1996 with 109 title wins, 1556 matches and 1,274 match wins.

The Backhand Smash in Action

The continental grip is usually the most advisable type of grip advised when going for a smash, especially a backhand smash. However, some players are comfortable with the Eastern grip in executing this move. The upward throwing motion is almost identical to the serve with a difference seen in the position as well as the footwork. A backhand smash can be executed with one or two hands. it can be also hit with one or both feet on the ground. Among the other popular types of smash popularized in tennis includes the skyhook ass used by Jimmy Connors and the jump smash as popularized by Pete Sampras and Yannick Noah.

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