Backcourt

The backcourt in tennis is the area located between the service line and the baseline. Other net games such as badminton also use the term to describe this specific area in the court. In a doubles play, the formation of the team members, based on the tactics they device to win the match inevitably puts one of the player in the backcourt. In some instances, both players are placed in the backcourt area as well. Such knowledge on which player is effective in guarding the net or attacking from the backcourt is one of the tactical skills to explore when coaching or playing in tennis.

Defining the Backcourt

The whole of the tennis court measures 78 feet long and 27 feet in width for single matches. A wider court is used for double matches - 36 feet. The service line is located 21 feet away from the net. A clear space of 60 feet by 120 feet surrounds the court area for overrun balls. The backcourt is an area that starts from the baseline and stretches 6.40 meters away from the service area. The baseline is divided in half by the center mark parallel to the singles sidelines. These dimensions are regulated by the International Tennis Federation, the governing entity that governs all the tennis matches worldwide.

More About the Backcourt Area

The backcourt is the farthest section located on each of the opposite sides of the court furthest from the net area. In some instances, backcourt is referred to as the player that mainly plays on this side of the court during a team or doubles tennis match. Parallel to the net, this is also the area that marks the inbound limits of the service area. The term backcourt was first recorded in 1765 to 1775. The backcourt area of the tennis lawn sees the most number of thrilling matches during a doubles game. Sisters Venus and Serena Williams won 13 Grand Slam doubles titles together with Venus working on the net and Serena showing her prowess in the backcourt area. Serena has better volley technique over her sister and is well applauded for her A+ baseline game.

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