Chris Evert-Lloyd

Born Dec 21, 1954
Nationality United States United States

Earning the first 1974 Wimbledon championship at the age of 19, Christine Marie “Chris” Evert- Lloyd got her exposure in tennis through her father who was a professional tennis coach, himself. She started her formal lessons when she was 5 years old. At age 15, fans and critiques were impressed by her distinct skills when she won a semi-final game in North Carolina against Margaret Court, then the No. 1 player.

According to the book The Greatest Tennis Matches of the Twentieth Century written by Steve Flink, Evert is the 20th century’s third best female player. She comes after Martina Navratilova and Steffi Graf. Her achievement came when she never lost a game in the first round of the Grand Slam tournaments. She as well won three Grand Slam titles under the doubles category.

Born in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on December 21, 1954, Chris was once engaged to Jimmy Connors, Champion of Wimbledon game. Later, she married John Lloyd, the British tennis player. After her divorce with Lloyd, she wed Andy Mill, a professional ski racer in 1988 whom she divorced in December 4, 2006. Chris and Andy had three sons namely Alexander James, Nicholas Joseph and Colton Jack. In June 28, 2008, Chris and Greg Norman, Australian golfer, were married in the Bahamas. The couple, together with Chris’ three sons now lives in Boca Raton, Florida. They operate a tennis academy in that place with her name bearing the school. Chris also coaches a high school tennis team in Saint Andrews high school.

Evert had her fare share of wins and losses in her whole sporting career. But she garnered a record of 1,309-146 which is insofar the highest among other professional players in the history of tennis.

In 1974 to 1975, 1979 to 1980 and 1984 Chris subsequently won the French Open. She also took hold of the U.S. singles titles in 1975-1980 and 1982 as well as the Australian Open in 1982 and 1984.

She is now both inducted into the International World of Tennis Hall of Fame and National Museum of Racing.

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