Terry Bradshaw

Born Sep 2, 1948
Nationality United States United States
Nickname The Blond Bomber

Terry Paxton Bradshaw is a retired professional American football player in the National Football League (NFL). He held the quarterback position for the Pittsburgh Steelers from 1970 until 1983. Bradshaw is a four-time Super Bowl champion, two-time Super Bowl MVP, the 1978 NFL Most Valuable Player, and a three-time Pro Bowl.

Born on September 2, 1948 in Illinois, he played football first at Woodlawn High School as well as set a national record for javelin throw. He then went on to play college football for Louisiana Tech where he made several passing records. In the 1970 NFL Round, he was selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers as the top overall pick.

During his second season, he was named as the starter but he still needed a couple of seasons to adjust. Known for having the most powerful arms in the NFL, he also called his own plays. He is famous for throwing the “Immaculate Reception” pass to Franco Harris in order to win against the Raiders in the AFC Divisional playoffs.

In 1978, he had his best season as he was named All-Pro, All-AFC, and the AP Most Valuable Player. Bradshaw helped his team win four Super Bowls in 1974, 1975, 1978, and 1979. He retired in 1983 due to a serious elbow injury.

His career player statistics are 51.9 completion percentage, 27,989 passing yards, 70.9 passer rating, 212–210 touchdowns-interceptions, 2,257 rushing yards, and 32 rushing touchdowns, Bradshaw is a College Football Hall of Famer and a Pro Football Hall of Famer.

Achievements:

• 4-time Super Bowl champion (IX, X, XIII, XIV)• 2-time Super Bowl MVP (XIII, XIV)• NFL Most Valuable Player (1978)• 3-time Pro Bowl (1975, 1978, 1979)• First-team All-Pro (1978)• Bert Bell Award (1978)• Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (1979)• 2-time NFL passing touchdowns leader (1978, 1982)• NFL 1970s All-Decade Team• Pittsburgh Steelers All-Time Team• Louisiana Tech Athletic Hall of Fame

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