Hack

The energy or “water” flows smoothly without friction if a hitter’s swing pattern is precise. The player will squeeze out of the body each drop in potential power. However, certain motions prevent the energy from flowing. These movements are called hack or swing clogging. All these movements are easy to identify and should be controlled to ensure a good game.

A hack means to swing uncomfortably and awkwardly on the ball. Sometimes an aggressive hitter was said to swing at any pitch, low, high, inside, or outside—the front footsteps to the pitcher alongside the back foot. You should be in a balanced position after a good load and a smooth step and be able to move your hands to the ball. Teach the hitters to hit the ball where they have been pitched, regardless of age, and hit the outfield.

How to Prevent Hack

You may have a player or two who have a hard time on the ball and seem to swing later than ever. It can become more transparent in the summer, as the competition levels often rise and young players face better and harder pitchers. Being behind on a pitcher does not mean you have a slow bat. Usually, it just means you are not prepared for swinging if you have to, and you need to prevent hack in the game. Train your players to see if they can develop a faster bat over time.

Many players are spinning back, experiencing hack, or starting with their weight back before they take their step. If you see that in a player who is having a hard time, get them closer to their starting position. Next, stress the weight of the back foot on the inside. Now you should feel that the most natural movement is ahead.

Some children will attempt to deal with this pressure by trying to put even more pressure on themselves. Tight muscles are lent to relax, and the key to rest lies in the hands for a hitter. If you think a hitch is too tense and you want to relax, lift your fingers out of your fat and go back as you stand. You can do so as a reminder that you will not strain and experience a hack. That keeps your hands loose and your body flexible in turn.

print

What's Your Take?

0 comments
Reply to
Loading